Novo Nordisk Obesity Drug Wins FDA Panel Support

Last week Thursday, an FDA advisory panel recommended the approval of Novo Nordisk’s injectable drug liraglutide for the treatment of obesity.

Liraglutide

Study: Chocolate Pills to Help Your Heart

A new study is being launched to see if pills containing the nutrients in dark chocolate can help prevent heart attacks and strokes.

Chocolate pills

9 Tips to Survive the Summer BBQ

In the United States, the 4th of July holiday is all about family, friends, fireworks and food. Lot’s of food. Indeed, nothing says summer holidays like a good old-fashioned BBQ. Here are some tips for how to grill safely and eat healthy this summer.

Healthy grilling

To Lower Diabetes Risk, Get a Good Night’s Sleep

We are all familiar with the negative consequences of getting too little sleep, but they may be more serious than just feeling a bit groggy. A new study published in the journal Science Translational Medicine has shown that sleep restriction, along with a disruption of one’s internal body clock, can raise the risk of obesity and type 2 diabetes [1]. This could explain the increased rates of these conditions in shift workers and others who work at night.

Good nights sleep

Inactivity May Encourage the Body to Create New Fat in Fat Cells

It’s obvious that obese people more have fat than non-obese people, but it’s not as clear how it happens. Do obese individuals have more adipocytes (fat cells) than lean people, or do they have the same number of adipocytes, just larger ones? It turns out to be both. But the way that comes to pass is just being worked out by scientists. Engineering Professor Dr. Amit Gefen and his colleagues at Tel Aviv University recently demonstrated in a mouse cell line model that preadipocytes (precursors to fat cells) subjected to prolonged periods of “mechanical stretching loads” — the kind of weight we put on our body tissues when we sit or lie down — differentiate significantly faster, and retain significantly larger fat droplets, than those that are not. The research was published in the American Journal of Physiology — Cell Physiology [1].

Lounging couple