Health Highlight: Researchers use gut bacteria to map genetic mutations in colorectal cancer tumours

Gut bacteria

Colorectal cancer is now understood to be definitely linked to microbial problems in the gut. Research has shown that the disease is linked with less numbers and diversity in the gut microbiome, and with the increased presence of more harmful strains. Therefore using gut bacteria to diagnose and even aid in cancer prevention is highly desirable due to it’s quick, non-invasive ease of investigation.

Now, a study from researchers at University of Minnesota has predicted key genetic mutations in colorectal tumours by analyzing the types of gut bacteria present around them. The team state that it could be possible to genetically classify the colorectal tumour a person has without having to do a biopsy and dissect it. Their findings were presented at the American Society of Human Genetics (ASHG) 2015 Annual Meeting.

Source: Healthinnovations

Health Highlights is a recurring series of curated health and medical news from around the web.

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