AAP Speaks Out Against Retail-based Clinics

Following closely behind the announcement that CVS is halting the sale of tobacco products and positioning itself as an integral part of the U.S. healthcare system, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) is telling parents they shouldn’t take their kids to retail-based healthcare clinics.

Retail-based healthcare clinics

Oral Immunotherapy Shows Promise as Treatment for Egg Allergy

Giving children and adolescents with egg allergy small but increasing daily doses of egg white powder holds the possibility of developing into a way to enable some of them to eat egg-containing foods without having allergic reactions, according to a study supported by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The study results will appear online in the July 19th issue of the New England Journal of Medicine [1].

Consortium of Food Allergy Research (CoFAR)

Third Reported Recovery From Clinical Rabies in the U.S.

Rabies is a serious — almost always fatal — viral infection of the central nervous system. The virus is present in the saliva of infected mammals, and is most often spread via a bite wound. Raccoons, skunks, bats, foxes, and coyotes are the most common carriers of rabies in the United States, though any mammal, including domestic dogs and cats, can become infected and transmit the disease. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention keeps statistics on rabies incidence in the U.S., and notes that cases are quite rare. Only one or two individuals a year become infected with the rabies virus, and prophylaxis (vaccination post-exposure, but prior to the development of symptoms) is almost always effective.

Bat

Controversial Anti-obesity Ads Aim to Reduce Childhood Obesity

A new series of billboard and television ads is outraging Georgians, who object to the “Stop Sugarcoating It, Georgia” campaign being run by the Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta pediatric hospital. The ads depict overweight and obese children in a variety of settings, and are meant to shock parents into action.

Stop childhood obesity

Keeping Children Safe Around Medication

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is implementing a new educational program to help remind parents of the importance of keeping medications — even those purchased over-the-counter — “Up and Away and Out of Sight” of young children. Toddlers in particular are at risk from medications and vitamins left within reach, as they have the manual dexterity to open many medication containers, coupled with a very young child’s tendency to explore the world orally. According to the CDC, one in 150 two-year-olds ends up in the emergency room each year due to medication overdose; most of these are the result of the child encountering and ingesting the medicine [1].