Sleep Champ App Helps Kids Sleep Like Champs

Lack of sleep is a national epidemic for kids today. Sleep deprivation can affect cognitive skills, health, academic achievement, and relationships. For children, getting enough sleep helps with everything from schoolwork, to behavior, to friendships, to physical wellbeing. Sometimes the problem isn’t how much, but how well, a child is sleeping. That’s where the Sleep Champ app can help.

Sleep Champ app

Have a Question for a Physician? There’s an App for That

When people have a medical question, they schedule an appointment to see their doctor. Palo Alto, California-based HealthTap aims to change that. The company’s free web and mobile applications enable 24/7 access to personalized, relevant and trusted health information from thousands of leading doctors without leaving your home or office.

HealthTap app

At the HealthTap website, users post questions and doctors post brief answers. The service is free and the doctors aren’t paid. Instead, they are allowed to use the resource to enhance their real-life practice with more efficient patient visits (saving everyone time and money), as well as build their reputation and attract new patients.

Fooducate App Helps Consumers Eat Healthy

Fooducate is an app for the iPhone and Android that allows consumers to get easy-to-understand information about the quality of a product by scanning the bar code with their smart phone. A first-place winner of the U.S. Surgeon General’s Healthy Apps Challenge, Fooducate was developed by dieticians and parents to help consumers see through some of the “tricks” product manufacturers use to conceal unhealthy ingredients, including artificial food colorings (which are controversial among nutritionists and scientists), high-fructose corn syrup, trans fats (which can legally “hide” in foods in small amounts), and various additives.


FDA Works Toward Regulating Medical Apps

In recent years, people are turning more and more to the Internet for health information and to “self-diagnose.” With an increasing variety of medical apps available for the iPhone, iPad, Android, and other mobile platforms, self-diagnosis has become even more accessible. Unfortunately, however, checking the boxes next to a variety of symptoms and waiting for a mobile device to spew forth a litany of potential ailments lacks the sensitivity and accuracy of a human diagnostician. Further, those who are not trained in medicine may misinterpret symptoms as erroneously relevant or erroneously irrelevant, leading to misdiagnosis.

Medical apps

Android App for Those Concerned about Cell Phone Radiation

While the link between cell phone use and brain tumors has not been scientifically established — in fact, a recent U.K. Health Protection Agency group review of the scientific literature concluded that there’s no convincing evidence that cell phones cause cancer — concerns about overexposure of brain cells to radiofrequency waves (RF) from cell phone antennae continue to circulate. While there may not be a well-established link between cell phone use and cancer or tumors, there’s nevertheless evidence that cell phone use alters brain cell metabolism (the rate at which brain cells burn sugar for energy) [1]. The significance of this finding is currently unknown, which makes some cell users nervous.

A company called Tawkon (pronounced “talk on”) has developed an app for the Android phone that can predict — not detect, since phones don’t have the ability to detect radiation — when a phone is most likely to be emitting high levels of RF on the basis of internal measurements, such as how strong the cell signal is.