Anti-parasite Drugs and the Nobel Prize for Medicine

nobel medal in medicine

The 2015 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was announced earlier this week [1]. The prize was awarded to three scientists who developed therapies by looking at natural, local substances, against parasitic infections.

The prize of 8-million-Swedish-krona ($1.2-million USD) was divided, with one half jointly to Drs. William C. Campbell, age 85, at Drew University in Madison, New Jersey, USA, and Satoshi Omura, age 80, at Kitasato University in Tokyo, Japan, for their work on a novel therapy against infections caused by roundworm parasites, and the other half to Dr. Youyou Tu, age 85, at the China Academy of Traditional Chinese Medicine in Beijing, China, for her work on a novel therapy against Malaria.

Scientists Hit Limit of Time to Read Scholarly Articles

Scientists may have hit the wall when it comes to reading articles. A 35-year trend of researchers reading an increasing number of scholarly manuscripts appears to be leveling off, accompanied by the bottoming out of time taken to read each article.

Scientists hit limit of time to read scholarly articles

Johnson & Johnson to Make Clinical Trial Data Open

In a move that promotes open science, Johnson & Johnson (J&J) announced last week that it will make all of its clinical trial data publicly available.

Data sharing

Pharma Company Success Depends on More Efficient R&D

According to a new report from Tufts Center for the Study of Drug Development (Tufts CSDD), although many pharmaceutical companies are increasing the pace of new products by improving the efficiency of clinical trial operations, their medium- and long-term success will increasingly depend on their ability to support more efficient research and development (R&D) models.

Worldwide total pharma R&D spending 2004-2018

Study Identifies Skin Biomarker for Parkinson’s Disease

Researchers from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) report in the October 29th issue of the journal Neurology that elevated levels of the protein alpha-synuclein can be detected in the skin of Parkinson’s disease patients [1]. The finding offers a potential biomarker to enable doctors to identify and diagnose Parkinson’s before the disease has reached an advanced stage.

Parkinsons disease biomarker in skin