Q&A: How do I Make Sure I’m Eating Right During Pregnancy?

Question: I just found out I’m pregnant, and want to make sure I eat well. How much do I need to eat, and what kinds of foods are best? How much weight should I gain?

Eating right during pregnancy

Q&A: What are Nitrates in Food and Why Should I Worry About Them?

Question: I’ve heard that nitrates in food are dangerous and that I should avoid them. What are nitrates, why are they a problem, and what foods contain them?


Scientists Correct Sickle Cell Disease in Adult Mice

National Institutes of Health (NIH)-funded scientists have corrected sickle cell disease in adult laboratory mice by activating production of a special blood component normally produced before, but not after, birth.

Sickle cell disease is a recessive genetic disorder caused by a single base mutation in the gene for hemoglobin, beta locus (HBB). Hemoglobin is responsible for transporting oxygen throughout the body. People living with sickle cell disease have two copies of an altered gene that produces sickle hemoglobin instead of normal adult hemoglobin. Sickle hemoglobin changes shape after releasing its oxygen, causing the red blood cell to become stiff, misshapen and sticky, and slowing blood flow to tissues. This process damages organs and causes pain.

Normal hemoglobin vs sickle cell