NIH and Lilly Collaborate, Aim to Make Drug Development Pipelines More Productive

Over the past decade, collaborative research efforts to support the discovery and development of medicines has increased dramatically. Last month, the National Institutes of Health and Eli Lilly and Company announced a new collaboration: they will generate a publicly available resource to profile the effects of thousands of approved and investigational medicines in a variety of advanced disease-relevant testing systems [1]. In-depth knowledge of the biological profiles of these medicines may enable researchers to better predict treatment outcomes, improve drug development, and lead to more specific and effective approaches.

NCATS/Lilly collaboration

Keeping Children Safe Around Medication

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is implementing a new educational program to help remind parents of the importance of keeping medications — even those purchased over-the-counter — “Up and Away and Out of Sight” of young children. Toddlers in particular are at risk from medications and vitamins left within reach, as they have the manual dexterity to open many medication containers, coupled with a very young child’s tendency to explore the world orally. According to the CDC, one in 150 two-year-olds ends up in the emergency room each year due to medication overdose; most of these are the result of the child encountering and ingesting the medicine [1].

What is Your Prescription Drug IQ?

Almost half of all Americans take at least one prescription drug [1]. Over 20% of the population takes three or more prescription drugs a month [1]. Not taking a medication — or taking too much or too little — can actually make many conditions worse. Drug interactions can also make a drug ineffective or cause serious adverse reactions.

How much do you know about the medicines you’re taking?
What is your prescription drug IQ?

Looking through a medicine cabinet

Faculty of 1000 Celebrates Ten Years Illuminating Top Biomedical Research Literature

Earlier this month, Faculty of 1000 marked ten years highlighting the top literature of biology and medical research. Faculty of 1000 (F1000) is a website for researchers and clinicians that provides ratings of and commentary on scientific research papers. The service acts as a filter, identifying and evaluating the most significant articles from biomedical research publications. A peer-nominated ‘Faculty’ of scientists and clinicians rate the articles they read, tag them for further classification, and explain their importance.

F1000

Sun Exposure, Vitamin D Can Affect Breakdown of Medicines

Genetic variation has been though to be responsible for the differences between people to metabolize certain drugs. The results of a recent study from the Karolinska Institutet in Sweden suggest that it may be even more complicated. Swedish reserchers have found that the body’s ability to break down medicines may be closely related to sunlight exposure and vitamin D, and thus may vary with the seasons. The study, published in the journal Drug Metabolism & Disposition, offers a completely new model to explain individual differences in the effects of drugs [1].

Sunlight can influence the breakdown of medicines in the body