Teens’ Poor Breakfast Choices Predict Obesity, High Blood Sugar as Adults

Teenagers who don’t eat a good breakfast are more likely to be obese and have high blood sugar in adulthood. That’s the result of a recent study published in the journal Public Health Nutrition.

Healthy breakfast

Increased Red Meat Consumption Linked to Higher Diabetes Risk

According to a new long-term observational study from researchers at the Harvard School of Public Health and the National University of Singapore, increasing the number of servings of red meat over time increases the risk of getting type 2 diabetes, while cutting back reduces the danger. The study is published in JAMA Internal Medicine.

Red meat

Sugar, Diabetes and a Call for Regulation

Dr. Robert Lustig, a pediatric endocrinologist at University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) who has been crusading about the evils of sugar for decades, has watched more and more of his young patient population become obese. He recently published a study in the journal PLOS One demonstrating that increased sugar consumption directly leads to increased rates of diabetes [1].


Study Suggests Light-to-Moderate Drinking During Pregnancy Is Ok

A series of research articles in the British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology suggest that light-to-moderate drinking during pregnancy (up to 8 drinks per week) does not affect IQ [1], intelligence, attention, and executive function [2], selective and sustained attention [3], or general intelligence [4] in 5-year-old children.

Drinking wine while pregnant

Cognitive Function and Obesity: Does Your BMI Link to Your IQ?

In addition to the well-known impact on risk for disorders such as diabetes and reduced life-expectancy, the effects of obesity may extend to psychological function. The so-called obesity epidemic may be causing decline in cognitive function through direct and indirect impacts on brain functioning. An expanding waistline thus appears to link to decreasing ability to learn and remember.

Obesity and memory