Health Highlight: Researchers use gut bacteria to map genetic mutations in colorectal cancer tumours

Gut bacteria

Colorectal cancer is now understood to be definitely linked to microbial problems in the gut. Research has shown that the disease is linked with less numbers and diversity in the gut microbiome, and with the increased presence of more harmful strains. Therefore using gut bacteria to diagnose and even aid in cancer prevention is highly desirable due to it’s quick, non-invasive ease of investigation.

Now, a study from researchers at University of Minnesota has predicted key genetic mutations in colorectal tumours by analyzing the types of gut bacteria present around them. The team state that it could be possible to genetically classify the colorectal tumour a person has without having to do a biopsy and dissect it. Their findings were presented at the American Society of Human Genetics (ASHG) 2015 Annual Meeting.

Source: Healthinnovations

Health Highlights is a recurring series of curated health and medical news from around the web.

Anti-parasite Drugs and the Nobel Prize for Medicine

nobel medal in medicine

The 2015 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was announced earlier this week [1]. The prize was awarded to three scientists who developed therapies by looking at natural, local substances, against parasitic infections.

The prize of 8-million-Swedish-krona ($1.2-million USD) was divided, with one half jointly to Drs. William C. Campbell, age 85, at Drew University in Madison, New Jersey, USA, and Satoshi Omura, age 80, at Kitasato University in Tokyo, Japan, for their work on a novel therapy against infections caused by roundworm parasites, and the other half to Dr. Youyou Tu, age 85, at the China Academy of Traditional Chinese Medicine in Beijing, China, for her work on a novel therapy against Malaria.

Long-term Depression Elevates Stroke Risk in Older Adults

A Harvard University study has found that long-term depression in people over 50 could more than double their risk of having a stroke. The risk remains significantly high even after the depression eases.

Long term depression in 50s increases risk of stroke

Dying Matters: Talk, Plan, Live

During Dying Matters Awareness Week (May 18-24), the Public Health Agency (PHA) is urging everyone to take the opportunity to talk openly with those closest to them about dying, death and bereavement. This year’s theme is ‘Talk, Plan, Live’ (hashtag #YODO, which stands for You Only Die Once).

Talk, Plan, Live

To the Edge of the Sky: the Fight to Save Children’s Lives and End Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

New drugs are being developed to treat Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy — and many other rare diseases — but the treatments are stalled at the FDA. A new Kickstarter campaign is raising funds to complete a documentary about parents fighting to stop Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy and gain access to potentially life-saving drugs before the disease kills their children.

To the Edge of the Sky