Scientists Detect Malaria in 15 Minutes with 20-cent Paper Centrifuge

Stanford bioengineers have created an ultra-low-cost, hand-spun┬ácentrifuge that separates blood into its individual components in only 1.5 minutes [1]. Inspired by an ancient children’s toy called a whirligig, the “paperfuge”┬ácan be used to detect malaria in blood in just 15 minutes.

Paperfuge

New Brain Implant Fuel Cell Runs On Sugar

MIT researchers have developed a new fuel cell that could be used to power brain implants in coming years [1]. Just like human cells, the fuel cells run on glucose, which is the most common sugar in nature and in the human body. Human cells derive energy from glucose through a process called oxidation — a part of metabolism — that takes electrons from the glucose and passes those electrons from enzyme to enzyme in the cell, generating the energy molecule adenosine triphosphate (ATP).

Fuel cell

Researchers Develop “Tooth Tattoo” to Help Detect Bacteria in the Mouth

A team of researchers led by Dr. Michael McAlpine of Princeton University have developed a gold- and carbon-based biosensor that can be affixed to a tooth [1]. The purpose of the sensor, which is made up primarily of a very strong form of carbon called graphene, is to detect sequences of DNA that are specific to pathogenic bacteria.

Tooth tattoo

Using the Brain to Control Robotic Arms

The BrainGate Company is a privately-held firm focused on the creation of technology that will allow severely disabled individuals, including those with traumatic spinal cord injury and loss of limbs, to communicate and control common everyday functions by thought alone.

The BrainGate neural interface system consists of a sensor to monitor brain signals together with computer software and hardware, which turns brain signals into digital commands for external devices. This is a type of brain-computer interface intended to put robotics and other assistive technology under the brain’s control. The size of a baby aspirin, the sensor contains 100 hair-thin electrodes that can record the activity of small groups of brain cells. It is implanted into the motor cortex, a part of the brain that directs movement.

iSonea to Build Mobile Asthma Management Apps on Qualcomm’s Platform

iSonea Limited is an emerging medical technology company developing innovative, non-invasive devices and mobile health apps to improve the management of chronic, costly respiratory disorders such as asthma and COPD. The company has developed proprietary respiratory acoustic technologies that enable the capture, storage and objective analysis of respiratory sounds and without relying on patient assistance.

iSonea