Amid Debate, First Proton Therapy Center Opens in New Jersey

All too often, the most brutal part of a bout with cancer is radiation therapy. X rays are electromagnetic waves that travel with a constant amount of energy, so although they effectively kill cancer cells, they pass through the skin and healthy tissues on their way to and from the tumor. In doing so, they damage the normal cells in their path. Protons, on the other hand, are particles that have a mass and a charge (they are positive). They can thus be targeted with exquisite specificity only to the tumor site, emitting the bulk of their radiation there and there only and sparing patients the terrible side effects that can accompany therapy with X rays.

ProCure gantry room

New USDA Labeling Requirements for Meat and Poultry

According to the USDA, as of March 1, most meat and poultry products in the U.S. will have nutrition labels [1]. The rule applies to ground and chopped meat and poultry, plus the most popular cuts of raw meat and poultry. The aim of the new requirement is to give consumers access to information that aids in making healthy choices.

Meat nutrition label

Obama Budget Calls for Sustained Investment in Research

In his State of the Union address last month, President Barack Obama reaffirmed the prioritization of science and technology in his plans for the nation’s future. The President’s new economic plan calls for maintaining a commitment to funding research and development that can improve our quality of life.

Obama budget calls for sustained investment in research

F1000 Launches Open Access Publishing for Biology and Medicine

This week, the Faculty of 1000 (F1000), announced F1000 Research, a new fully Open Access publishing program across biology and medicine that will launch later this year [1]. F1000 Research is intended to address the major issues afflicting scientific publishing today: timely dissemination of research, peer review, and sharing of data.

F1000 Research

Bath Salts Case Underscores Dangers of Legal Drugs

A New Orleans woman recently lost an arm to necrotizing fasciitis — the so-called “flesh-eating bacteria” — after injecting a drug called “bath salts,” according to a case study report in the medical journal Orthopedics [1]. She presented with cellulitis, a skin infection, two days after attending a party at which she injected the drug. The infection initially responded to administered antibiotics, but then worsened. The woman lost not only her arm, but her breast and a large portion of her chest wall to amputation. The significant removal of tissue was necessary to prevent the spread of the bacteria.